A CONVERSATION WITH DIANA MARKOSIAN:

APRIL 28 

9PM DOHA/11AM PST

BOOK NOW:

https://event.webinarjam.com/channel/TasweerMarkosian

 

Join Diana Markosian with Charlotte Cotton to unpack the various photographic and filmic strategies at play in Markosian’s Santa Barbara - creating the story of Markosian’s family’s journey from post-Soviet Russia to the U.S. in the 1990s. Through a series of staged photographs, a narrative video, and her first monographic book, the artist reconsiders her family history from her mother’s perspective, relating to her for the first time as a woman rather than a parent, and coming to terms with the profound sacrifices her mother made to become an American. Diana Markosian (born in Moscow, 1989) is a Russian American photographer of Armenian descent. Her photographs have been published in National Geographic, the New Yorker, and the New York Times. 

 

ABOUT DIANA MARKOSIAN'S SANTA BARBARA:

Diana Markosian’s Santa Barbara is a multi-form video and photography project that centres on the artist’s recounting and dramatizing of her and her family’s story.  As a

young child of Armenian descent, living in Moscow with her mother and brother, the American soap opera Santa Barbara was broadcast on Russian terrestrial television and was the aspirational – albeit fictionalized – window onto life in America for many viewers.  With hopes of a better future for her family, Markosian’s mother started the process of becoming a mail-order bride, which eventually led to her arriving in California with her

two young children and marrying an older man who lived in the fabled Santa Barbara. Markosian’s film and photographic works melds the fictionalization of her family’s story from each of their vantage points (in collaboration with the original script writers for the American soap opera Santa Barbara), with the realities of Markosian’s process of casting actors to play the familial roles, and also her real mother’s reactions and remembrances.  

DIANA MARKOSIAN 1.jpg

Diana Markosian's, Santa Barbara